Sunday, May 11, 2014

Notes on Singapore Dividend Stocks

Unknown to many, one of the resources that I like to use is TopYields.nl. Not because I was a former Dutch PR and I like the .nl extension, but because it is one of the few sites that calculates dividends of the STI constituents without considering special distributions.

I feel that looking at the dividend yield without special distributions is more accurate and more conservative, especially if the aim of the dividends paid out are as income replacements.

Another website that I like is of course InvestmentMoats and his Dividend Screener. He has listed stocks which he feels has - obviously - investment moats. It is a good place to look at which of the non-REITs has been included into his portfolio and then carry on to analyze them from there. Unsurprisingly, the 3 major telcos are listed in his screener. I like that he has special colour coding for factors that are showing extraordinarily good values. It pops out at you and helps you see which stocks looks nice and attractive.

Although InvestmentMoats does list quite a lot of REITs, I think the best resource is actually reitdata. This no-frills website does what you think it does, gives you information on REITs. Another nice major REIT data source, is from My Stocks Investing Journey. He comes up with a monthly analysis of the SGX listed REITs as well.

By the same people of reitdata, they also have yieldstocks, which similarly presented in the same fashion of the REIT data, but instead is used to show other SGX stocks which have promising yields.

Anyway, these are just some of the tools that I use. I use plenty more, but I'd thought I'd share one of the more common ones that I usually reference to have a good overview of the playing field. However, nothing beats sitting down with annual reports and coming up with your own Excel spreadsheet to record down info and take down notes and figures from stocks. For example, if you don't do these kind of dirty works, you'd probably never know that SPH owns 72% of SPH REIT and owns 15% of M1. Instead of holding on to these 3 pieces separately, why not make a more conservative bet by just owning SPH to get exposure into the rest?

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